Book Review: How to Become a Pirate Hunter by Marty Reeder

If you like books about destiny, pirates, and adventures on the high seas, then How to Become a Pirate Hunter may be for you. This book was written by Marty Reeder and published by Cedar Fort Publishing. Though I felt the style and approach to this story could use improvement, the concept is certainly interesting and unique.

how to become a pirate hunter image via cedar fort
Image via Cedar Fort Publishing

“You are just as talented as anyone else out there. You just haven’t been in the right circumstances to prove it.”

Summary

As long as Eric can remember, he has been useless. With no real talents or abilities, he just floats aimlessly through life. But that all changes when he meets Charlotte. She can see people’s natural-born abilities, and she tells Eric that he is meant to become a pirate hunter. After a little time traveling, Charlotte gives Eric the opportunity to test out his pirate hunting skills. But when Eric takes on the dreaded Willard Twins, he may have met his match.

“He found himself in an area and time period unfamiliar to him. He faced hostile foes not only in the sea, but also back at land in the forms of Governor Rose and Captain Bellview. All this . . . and Eric did not even have his driver’s license yet.”

Review—3 Stars

I received a digital copy of How to Become a Pirate Hunter from Cedar Fort Publishing in exchange for my honest review.

I’ll admit that I was a little disappointed with this book. A time traveling pirate hunter is a great concept, but I felt the approach and style was lacking. For one, Eric’s character did not go through a development process. He started out feeling useless and unconfident, but when he traveled to the past, he instantly became an intelligent, self-assured leader. This change happened in a blink, and I didn’t buy it. Plus this book is about how to become a pirate hunter, and we didn’t even get to see that process.

 “And now that I’ve spent this time with you, I am more convinced than ever. No matter what you were born to do. No matter what you have accomplished here, or what you think you haven’t. You are special, Eric. You really are. Not because of your talent. Because of you.”

Additionally, the point of view kept throwing me off because the third-person limited kept jumping into others’ perspectives. This omniscient/limited mix felt sloppy, especially when it explored the thoughts of minor, unimportant characters. This point of view also contributed to a whole lot of telling rather than showing. The constant telling of what happened and what everyone thought about it made everything seem too obvious.

Eric also lacked a lot of potential internal conflict, and when this conflict did appear, it was after long intervals of nothing at all. There also could have been a lot more conflict had he experienced failures with pirate hunting early on rather than amazing successes. And he didn’t even consider the effect this whole experience might have had on his future and his family until the end of the book. Though I liked the concept of the story and its villain, overall I felt it needed some work.

To see more reviews of How to Become a Pirate Hunter, check it out on Goodreads, Amazon, or its Cedar Fort blog tour page.

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